Vulgar History Presents: So This Asshole: Count Cagliostro

Bonus!!

This is a preview of So This Asshole, a new spinoff podcast available through my Patreon. This side series will share the wild stories of some of the many, many assholes involved in the stories of the women profiled on the main Vulgar History podcast.

This episode is all about Giuseppe Balsamo, aka Count Alessandro di Cagliostro (1743-1795), who was briefly mentioned in the Vulgar History episode about Jeanne de la Motte.

Referenced in this podcast:

How To Ruin A Queen by Jonathan Beckman (which is a GREAT book!)

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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6: Lucy Percy Hay, Countess of Carlisle

Lucy Percy Hay, Countess of Carlisle (1599-1660) was a British noblewoman known for her espionage work surrounding the English Civil War. But she was not just a spy… was a #LADYSPY, mentored by one of the most memorable heroines of a previous Vulgar History episode!! Will it all be enough for her to take the top spot in our Scandalicious Scale?? 

Mentioned in this episode: 

Sweet Valley Sagas by Francine Pascal 

Court Lady and Country Wife: Two Noble Sisters in Seventeenth-Century England by Lita-Rose Betcherman 

Invisible Agents: Women and Espionage in Seventeenth-Century Britain by Nadine Akkerman 

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

5: Mary Toft

Mary Toft (1701 – 1763) was an English peasant who became notorious for her involvement in her family’s scheme to pretend she’d given birth to seventeen rabbits. The story is profoundly, continuingly, and rage-inducingly bananas.

Mentioned in this episode:

The book The Imposteress Rabbit Breeder: Mary Toft and Eighteenth-Century England by Karen Harvey

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

4: Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed

Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed (7 August 1560 – 21 August 1614) was a Hungarian noblewoman who, for a time, oversaw more properties and estates than anyone else in Europe. Her undoing came about when the Palatine of Hungary accused her and four servants of mass murder, and she’s now remembered as more of a myth than a person. Did she really commit these gruesome crimes, and bathe in the blood of her victims?? And how will she score on the scandalicious scale??

Countess Dracula: The Life and Times of Elisabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess by Tony Thorne

The Unobscured podcast by Aaron Mahnke

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

3: Jeanne de Valois-Saint-Rémy, Comtesse de la Motte

Jeanne de Valois-Saint-Rémy, Comtesse de la Motte (22 July 1756 – 23 August 1791) was an illegitimate descendant of the French royal family who became famous on her own as AN INCREDIBLY CLEVER CON ARTIST/HEROINE! But how will she score on the Scandalicious Scale??

Mentioned in this episode:

How to Ruin a Queen by Jonathan Beckman

Frock Flicks review of the hats and wigs in The Affair of the Necklace

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

2: Frances Howard, Duchess of Somerset

Frances Howard Carr, Duchess of Somerset (31 May 1590 – 23 August 1632) was a British noblewoman who, among other things, pled guilty to murder and also most likely faked her own virginity inspection. She also showed much more bosom in her portraiture than anyone in the history of breasts and lived her life both physically and psychologically Tits Out. But where does that place her on the Scandaliciousness Scale??? 

Mentioned in this episode: 

The Poison Bed by E.C. Fremantle 

The Overbury Affair: The Murder Trial That Rocked The Court of King James I by Miriam Allen DeFord 

Unnatural Murder: Poison in the Court of James I by Anne Somerset

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1: Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick (17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821) was Queen consort of the United Kingdom for a year, but that’s basically the least interesting thing about her. Where does our inaugural story subject score on the Scandalicious Scale?? And was she really having an affair with Bartolomeo, her Italian servant???  

Mentioned in this episode: 

“What Eye Has Wept For George IV” from the Noble Blood podcast

Caroline & Charlotte: Regency Scandals by Alison Plowden

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vulgar History – Coming Soon!

It’s a trailer for the new feminist women’s history comedy podcast, Vulgar History! Subscribe to this feed in your fav podcast situation, and get ready to learn lots of scandalicious stories of women from (mostly) British history who you (likely) haven’t heard of before.

Other stuff:

History writing: annfosterwriter.com

Recommended books: bookshop.org/lists/vulgar-history-recommends

Patreon: patreon.com/annfosterwriter

Merch: teespring.com/stores/vulgarhistory