Sally Hemings, part one

Sally Hemings was born in 1773 to enslaved mother Elizabeth Hemings and Elizabeth’s enslaver, John Wayles. She grew up alongside her mother and siblings in enslavement in Virginia at around the same time as the American Revolution.

In part one, we learn about Sally’s family and childhood and how a series of coincidences led her to live in Paris just before the French Revolution.

0:00 Intro

10:34 Sally’s story begins

36:16 Ads

1:06:15 Extro

The image for this episode is from the multimedia installation The Life of Sally Hemings at Thomas Jefferson’s plantation home, Monticello. Learn about the exhibit here (spoilers for part two of this podcast, if you don’t already know her story!)

References:

The Hemingses of Monticello by Annette Gordon-Reed

The Life of Sally Hemings (Monticello.org)

Vulgar History: Black History podcast playlist on Spotify

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The Public Universal Friend (with Kit Heyam)

This season on Vulgar History, we’re investigating How Do You Solve A Problem Like Marie Antoinette? To do so, we’re looking at the lives of people who lived during the revolutionary era of the 18th century.

In honour of Pride Month, we’re talking this week about the trans historical figure The Public Universal Friend. The Friend, aka PUF, grew up as a Quaker in late 18th-century Pennsylvania. Were they also a cult leader? Listen and find out!

We’re joined this week by three-time returning guest Kit Heyam to talk about this fascinating historical figure.

Organizations to Support:

Kit recommends supporting TransActual (UK)

Ann recommends supporting:

Point of Pride (US)

Trans Care+ (Canada)

The Trevor Project (US)

References:

Before We Were Trans: A New History of Gender by Kit Heyam

Public Universal Friend essay by Amanda Carson Banks from Women in World History

Vulgar Pride podcast playlist on Spotify

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Deborah Sampson aka Robert Shurtleff (with Greta LaFleur)

This season on Vulgar History, we’re investigating How Do You Solve A Problem Like Marie Antoinette? To do so, we’re looking at the lives of people who lived during the revolutionary era of the 18th century.

In honour of Pride Month, this week we’re talking about trans historical figure Deborah Sampson/Robert Shurtleff. Deborah/Robert fought in the American Revolution in a sort of Mulan scenario and their gender presentation has lots to discuss.

Greta LaFleur, associate professor of American studies at Yale University, is our guest this week to help explain Deborah/Robert’s story and offer an introduction to the American Revolution.

Organizations to Support:

Greta recommends supporting the Trans Justice Funding Project (US)

Ann recommends supporting:

Point of Pride (US)

Trans Care+ (Canada)

The Trevor Project (US)

References:

The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America by Greta LaFleur

Trans Historical: Gender Plurality Before the Modern, co-edited by Greta LaFleur

Deborah Sampson essay by Harry M. Ward from Women in World History

Vulgar Pride podcast playlist on Spotify

Get 15% off all the gorgeous jewellery and accessories at common.era.com/vulgar or go to commonera.com and use code VULGAR at checkout

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Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission. Use this link to shop there and support Vulgar History.

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Charlotte Badger (with Jennifer Ashton)

This season on Vulgar History, we’re investigating the question How Do You Solve A Problem Like Marie Antoinette? To do so, we’re looking at the lives of women who lived during the revolutionary era of the 18th century.

This week, we’re headed to New Zealand (via England and Australia) to learn how the Industrial and American Revolutions contributed to the adventurous life of a convicted thief named Charlotte Badger. This week’s guest is Jennifer Ashton, author of Thief, Confict, Pirate, Wife: The Many Histories of Charlotte Badger.

References:

Thief, Convict, Pirate, Wife: The Many Histories of Charlotte Badger by Jennifer Ashton

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Support Vulgar History on Patreon 

Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission. Use this link to shop there and support Vulgar History.

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Constanze Mozart (with Kristin Franseen)

This season on Vulgar History, we’re investigating the question How Do You Solve A Problem Like Marie Antoinette? To do so, we’re looking at the lives of women who lived during the revolutionary era of the 18th century.

This week, Kristin Franseen joins us to discuss Constanze Mozart, best known as the wife and then widow of Amadeus Mozart.

Learn about the Grove Music Online website of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Project

Kristin’s references:

Mozart’s Women: His Family, His Friends, His Music by Jane Glover

1791: Mozart’s Last Year by H.C. Robbins Landon

“Salieri’s Cosi fan tutte” by Bruce Alan Brown and John Rice, Cambridge Opera Journal 8, no. 1

Mozart’s Letters, Mozart’s Life edited by Robert Spaethling

A Mozart Pilgrimage by Vincent and Mary Novellos

Operation Olive Branch

Operation Olive Branch Instagram

Operation Olive Branch TikTok

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Marie-Josèphe Angélique

It’s season seven! This year we’re investigating the question How Do You Solve A Problem Like Marie Antoinette? Marie Antoinette was famously executed during the French Revolution. To understand how that happened means understanding the French Revolution, which means understanding the spirit of revolution that occurred around the world in the 18th century. This is why the first part of season seven is sub-titled Age of Revolution.

Things kick off with the story of Marie-Josephe Angelique, an enslaved Black Portuguese woman who may or may not have burned down Montreal in 1734.

References:

The Hanging of Angélique: The Untold Story of Canadian Slavery and the Burning of Old Montréal by Afua Cooper

Wikipedia

https://globalnews.ca/news/211853/montreal-to-honour-slave-marie-josephe-angelique-with-park-name/

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-hanging-of-angelique-book-review

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/marie-joseph-angelique

https://this.org/2017/03/27/new-film-takes-a-much-needed-glance-into-canadas-uncomfortable-past-with-racism-and-slavery/

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Author Interview: June Hur (A Crane Among Wolves)

Today’s guest, June Hur, is the author of historical novels that read like K-dramas. Her latest, A Crane Among Wolves, is set in Joseon-era Korea during the reign of tyrant King Yeonsan.

Learn more about June and her books at junehur.com

Buy a copy of A Crane Among Wolves from bookshop.org

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Author Interview: Ella McLeod (author of The Map that Led to You)

We’re talking about pirate history this week with Ella McLeod, author of the new YA novel The Map That Led To You! In her research, Ella dove into the world of folklore, pirateology, nautical history, and the voices of people left out of history.

Buy a copy of The Map That Led to You

Ella’s Instagram

Ella’s podcast, Comfort Creatures

Theme music by The Severn Duo

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Vulgar History is an affiliate of Bookshop.org, which means that a small percentage of any books you click through and purchase will come back to Vulgar History as a commission. Use this link to shop there and support Vulgar History.

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Las Soldaderas of the Mexican Revolution (with Cristina Lumague)

We’re getting into a revolutionary, pants-on vibe this week with a look at Las Soldaderas: women who fought during the Mexican Revolution and whose contributions to victory often go uncredited.

Guiding us through their pants-wearing ways is Cristina Lumague, longtime editor of Vulgar History!

References:

Soldaderas in the Mexican Military: Myth and History by Elizabeth Salas and Elizabeth Blackshear Flinn

Revolutionary Women of Texas and Mexico: Portraits of Soldaderas, Saints, and Subversives

Cristina’s podcasts:

Historias Unknown https://www.historiasunknown.com/episodes/

Espooky tales https://www.espookytales.com/follow

Espooky Tales socials: tiktok https://www.tiktok.com/@espookytales IG https://www.instagram.com/espookytales

A Little Bit de Todo (short daily podcast, available May 5th) https://episodes.fm/1735794761

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Thanadelthur (with Rosalie Tsannie-Burseth)

Today we’re talking about Thanadelthur, a Dene woman who had a profound impact on the Dene people in Northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the eighteenth-century fur trade. Much of Thanadelthur’s story is shared through oral storytelling among the Dene community. Today’s guest, Rosalie Tsannie-Burseth is a member of the Hatchet Lake Dënesųłiné First Nation in Treaty 10 territory.

References:

The Legend of Thanadelthur: Elders’ Oral History and Hudson’s Bay Company Journals by Rosalie Tsannie-Burset

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Episode image by Wai Tien from The Peacemaker: Thanadelthur by David A. Robertson

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